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Walks & Visits

We provide you with unusual guided visits of museums specializing in painting, sculpture, architecture, as well as French and international institutions. We also give you the opportunity to find out more about the French handcraft thanks to visits of different workshops relating to tapestries, perfume and luxury products. All of our visits are led by highly experienced and English-speaking guides.

Alternatively, if you want to get to know Paris better, why not join one of our experienced guides on a walking tour of specific locations. We offer themed walks though Paris. They will guide you through the back streets of Paris, typical markets, hidden courtyards, passages and interesting buildings. Our guides will show you traces of earlier times while telling you about the events that happened there and the people who once lived there. You are guaranteed to learn something new about Paris on every walk.


More Details

Upcoming walks & visits

    • 27 Mar 2019
    • 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
    • 15, Avenue Montaigne, 75008 Paris: metro Alma Marceau (line 9) or Franklin Roosevelt (line 1)
    • 11
    Register

    Opened in 1913, the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées is without doubt one of the most beautiful performing arts venues in Paris.

    This listed building houses three theaters – Le Grand Théâtre is home to opera, dance, symphony concerts and recitals, while the more intimate settings of La Comédie and Le Studio host repertory theater.

    This art deco style building was designed by a daring group of artists: the architects Van de Velde and the Perret Brothers, the sculptor Antoine Bourdelle who carved Isadora Duncan among others in the bas-reliefs on the facade, the painters Maurice Denis and Edouard Vuillard and René Lalique who designed the lights.

    The artistic adventure of the theater was marked throughout the century by the presence of prestigious composers, conductors, dancers and singers.

    This theater remains noted for the “scandal” of the first performance of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring by Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes whose music and choreography were shocking at that time.

    About the instructor: Holding a PhD in British and American Studies from the Sorbonne, Catherine Estivalezes has been involved for many years in a foundation for promoting contemporary art, before getting back to her Art History studies.

    • 03 Apr 2019
    • 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
    • 58 rue de Richelieu 75002 Paris
    • 16
    Register

    The Richelieu library, historic home of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France in the heart of Paris's 2nd arrondissement, has reopened its doors after several years of renovations.

    This historical site traces its history back to the 14th century. Manuscripts, Illumination books were being collected by the French King Charles V. The Richelieu site is the cradle of the National Library; it hosts art books ranging from the oldest manuscripts kept in France to contemporary ones, a collection of medals, coins and antiques, prints and photographs. Recently renovated, the court, the rotunda, the glass gallery have regained their splendor. The salle Labrouste (study room) will be seen from the outside as it is accessible only to the researchers and students.


    Come and discover with our guide Catherine, this French historic site.


    About the Instructor: Holding a PhD in British and American Studies from the Sorbonne, Catherine Estivalezes was involved for years in a foundation for promoting contemporary art, before returning to Art History studies. She has several years of experience in guiding, including districts, monuments, museums, and temporary exhibitions.


    Photo Credit: Public Domain

    • 06 Apr 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Meeting point to be confirmed later
    • 8
    Register

    The Chateau d'Hardelot is home to the "Centre Culturel de l'Entente Cordiale," a permanent exhibition curated by best-selling author Stephen Clarke.  This beautiful museum is set in a small French village that was popular with Charles Dickens when he needed to escape prying Victorian eyes to be with his mistress. 

    Clarke, who will lead this exclusive tour, describes the collaboration that resulted in the exhibition:  

    Back in 2012 the director of the Château d'Hardelot contacted me explaining that he intended to transform the temporary exhibition space into the "Centre Culturel de l'Entente Cordiale" based on my book 1000 Years of Annoying the French.

    We began a very fruitful exchange during which I suggested historical events that needed to be depicted, and the director went off in search of paintings, furniture, statues and other objects in every auction house and museum in France, buying, borrowing and requisitioning. 

    The result is a spectacular permanent exhibition that opened in 2014, and includes a fire screen depicting Joan of Arc, cartoons both mocking and glorifying Napoleon, furniture that belonged to King Louis-Philippe--a great Anglophile who first used the phrase "cordiale entente"--and busts of Queen Victoria and Napoleon III, on whom she had something of a crush. 

    Don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear Stephen Clarke telling anecdotes about all this as you tour the Château. Transport to/from the train station in the historic fishing port Boulogne-sur-Mer, the museum entry fee and tour plus lunch are included in the fee. Full details will be available in late March. 

    About the Instructor: When he self-published A Year in the Merde in 2004, printing up just 200 copies, author Stephen Clarke never dreamed it would become a worldwide bestseller, translated into more than 20 languages.  Since then he has written 5 more "Merde" novels as well as several other books that offer a humorous perspective on France and the French. The Merde Factor, Stephen Clarke's popular stage adaptation of one of his best-selling "Merde" novels was presented as part of WICE's 40th birthday celebrations last year.

    Photo Credit: Public Domain

    • 17 Apr 2019
    • 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
    • 2, rue de la Légion d'Honneur, 75007 Paris
    • 14
    Register

    Located in the 7th arrondissement, the Musée de la Légion d’Honneur is housed in an elegant neoclassical mansion, the Hôtel de Salm. This Hôtel was built in 1782 by architect Pierre Rousseau for Frederick III, Prince of Salm-Kyrburg. It was burned in 1871 during the Paris Commune and subsequently restored by subscription of medalists. Since 1804 this building has been the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur and the seat of France's highest honors: the Légion d'honneur (1802) created by First Consul Bonaparte, the Médaille militaire (1852), and the Ordre national du Mérite (1963). The current museum was created in 1925. It displays a history of France's honors, medals, decorations and knightly orders from Louis XI to the present, including Napoleonic souvenirs and more than 300 portraits. A special section is also dedicated to foreign orders. Please join us on a guided tour and discover this exceptional collection of military and civil decorations and orders from France and overseas.

    About the Instructor: Catherine Estivalezes holds a PHD in British and American Studies from the Sorbonne and has been involved for years in a Foundation for promoting Contemporary Art, before getting back to Art History studies. She has several years of experience in guiding, including districts, monuments, museums, and temporary exhibitions. 

    Photo Credit: Public Domain

    • 13 May 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Bd Auguste Blanqui 75013 PARIS
    • 13
    Register

    Discover with our guide Catherine this charming and peaceful walk through this typical district of Paris, located near the Place d’Italie, in the 13th district. La Butte aux Cailles is a special place in Paris: it has kept the atmosphere of a provincial village, with its peaceful streets, is street art paintings, its hilly streets. It was once home to a lot of communities who settled down in Paris either for political reasons (la Petite Russie) or for job opportunities (la Petite Alsace): the original settlements can still be seen. The Place de l’Abbé Hénocque with its charming houses, the Poterne des Peupliers, the artesian well, Sainte Anne de la Butte-aux-Cailles church will be amongst our discoveries.

    About the Instructor: Catherine Estivalezes holds a PHD in British and American Studies from the Sorbonne and has been involved for years in a Foundation for promoting Contemporary Art, before getting back to Art History studies. She has several years of experience in guiding, including districts, monuments, museums, and temporary exhibitions. 

    Photo Credit: Public Domain

    • 16 May 2019
    • 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM
    • Meeting point: Beffroi entrance, 2 place Emile Cresp, Montrouge
    • 10
    Register

    This Salon for contemporary art is quite unique in Paris - being right at the exit of metro station Mairie de Montrouge, which, since it is only one stop after Porte d'Orleans on line 4, makes it "still" in Paris!  It presents young artists that aren't represented by galleries yet and has been in existence since 1955, so this year edition will be the 65th.  The artists are chosen by  jury of arts professionals based on their applications.  This year, 52 artists were selected, 31 women, 20 men and 1 collective, coming from France and 11 other countries.   If you want to discover the future stars of the art world before everyone else, come join us!

    About the Instructor: Caroline Etter, art consultant, historian of art, and friend to both collectors and artists, has been immersed in the Paris art scene for 20 years.  After graduating with a degree in 20th-century decorative arts from the Sorbonne, she started her career working at the Villa Médicis in Rome and the Bibliothèque nationale de France.  Since then she’s been a curator, a journalist and a gallery manager.  She has created her own company helping private as well as corporate clients understand and buy contemporary art.

    Photo Credit: City Art Insider

    • 24 May 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    • 8, boulevard de Ménilmontant, 75020 Paris
    • 20
    Register

    Founded by Napoléon, established in 1804, the Père Lachaise cemetery is the largest garden cemetery in Paris and it is the most visited necropolis in the world. Upon its inauguration, in the early 19th century, it was considered to be too far from the city centre and the reputation of the area was dreadful. In order to attract newcomers, the transfer of the remains of Jean de la Fontaine and Molière were brought in the cemetery, soon after followed by those of Héloïse and Abélard. The strategy worked and made the reputation of Père Lachaise which, ever since, has become the most famous place to be buried in Paris. Artists, musicians, actors, composers, scientists, inventors etc. lay there: we will walk along this open air garden and discover some of the famous figures, focusing particularly on musicians, writers and artists.

    About the Instructor: Catherine Estivalezes holds a PHD in British and American Studies from the Sorbonne and has been involved for years in a Foundation for promoting Contemporary Art, before getting back to Art History studies. She has several years of experience in guiding, including districts, monuments, museums, and temporary exhibitions.

    Photo Credit: Public Domain

    • 03 Jun 2019
    • 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM
    • 55, rue du Docteur Blanche, 75016 PARIS
    • 16
    Register
    Paris’ 16th district offers an amazing insight into the history of Modern Architecture and Art Nouveau Style. Built in 1923 by Le Corbusier, la Maison la Roche, was commissioned by the collector Raoul La Roche. With this project, the architect used new industrial materials such as reinforced concrete, and set up the ideas which were later formulated in the ‘five points of Modern Architecture’. We will visit the house. Very close by, the Mallet Stevens’s street, hosts some beautiful examples of his style. Important figure of the Modernist School, decorator, designer, Mallet Stevens built these private mansions for himself and some of his friends. Our promenade will take us to visit the House “Maison la Roche” and explore the Art Nouveau style whose best representative of this movement born in the late 19th century was Hector Guimard.

    About the Instructor: Catherine Estivalezes holds a PHD in British and American Studies from the Sorbonne and has been involved for years in a Foundation for promoting Contemporary Art, before getting back to Art History studies. She has several years of experience in guiding, including districts, monuments, museums, and temporary exhibitions.

    Photo Credit: Public Domain

    • 06 Jun 2019
    • 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM
    • Meeting point: Centquatre entrance, 4 rue Curial
    • 10
    Register

    Circulation(s), the European Young Photography Festival, will present 30 photographers selected from all over Europe in the beautiful nave of Centquatre, located in the North of Paris, close to la Villette.  This visit will be an opportunity to discover new perspectives on Europe through photography, as well as the unique history of the handsome 19th century building, formerly the site of a  municipal undertaker and now a dynamic and very lively art center.

    About the Instructor: Caroline Etter, art consultant, historian of art, and friend to both collectors and artists, has been immersed in the Paris art scene for 20 years.  After graduating with a degree in 20th-century decorative arts from the Sorbonne, she started her career working at the Villa Médicis in Rome and the Bibliothèque nationale de France.  Since then she’s been a curator, a journalist and a gallery manager.  She has created her own company helping private as well as corporate clients understand and buy contemporary art.

    Photo Credit: City Art Insider

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